The Interview Process & Diversity

How to Know If A Potential Job Doesn’t Measure Up

D.A. Harvey

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Photo by LinkedIn Sales Solutions on Unsplash

In light of the current happenings in the world, a lot of workers are waking up to the fuckery that is corporate culture. They’ve noticed the inequities and forced niceties hidden behind work-induced anxiety and all the -isms. Many have had it.

The Great Resignation is happening. Employees are reevaluating their values and most jobs don’t measure up. While some are leaving the corporate plantation permanently, and becoming entrepreneurs, some are simply looking for better paying jobs with better working environments. If that is the case, you don’t want to leave one bad company for another. So here are a few ways to weed out a company during the interview process, saving you a future headache.

If you’ve ever been in an interview, you know it’s important to ask great questions. One question that I’ve recently started asking is, “ how would you describe the company culture?” If you ask the interviewer about the company culture and they give you an answer that does not seem sincere or they are unenthused, you know that they are just there for the paycheck. That’s not a great start. Another great question to ask about is their diversity initiative or how they make sure everyone feels included at work. This will give you insight into what you will be walking into if you are offered a position.

They make comments about or critique your appearance. If they do this please exit the interview. While this doesn’t seem like a big deal, it shows superficiality. An interview is about skills and abilities. If you were not qualified, you would not be sitting at the table. Now, if you’re dressed nicely and they compliment you, that’s one thing. To critique you is another. It’s a way to demean you.

They use trigger words like attitude or articulate. If you are a person of color, you’ve probably heard this once or twice in your life. “You are so articulate.” Okay, thank you for noticing but this is a job interview. Some people believe this is a compliment, it’s not. Using a statement like this in an interview or post-interview call is tone-deaf and just plain ignorant. It shows unchecked biases toward different peoples. This isn’t just limited to race, it could also apply to people from different…

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D.A. Harvey

Photographer-Writer-Mentor I'm attempting to live life on my terms using the freedom of creativity. My goal is to live life without the fear of failure.